Parlour » Parlour | Parlour http://archiparlour.org women, equity, architecture. Sun, 22 May 2016 07:40:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Women Transforming the City – Part 2 http://archiparlour.org/women-transforming-the-city-part-2/ http://archiparlour.org/women-transforming-the-city-part-2/#comments Fri, 15 Apr 2016 00:02:33 +0000 http://archiparlour.org/?p=13147 Parlour, the NCGE and AWS invite you to Women Transforming the City – Part 2, a lively discussion about women shaping our cities and environments.

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Parlour, the National Committee for Gender Equity and AWS invite you to Women Transforming the City – Part 2, a lively discussion about women shaping our cities and environments.

WTC2_speakers_small

The panel discussion will explore the powerful roles women play as activists, architects, planners, philanthropists, policy-makers and politicians. These roles shape the spaces, places and policies of Australian cities and set the context for future actions and engagement.

Panellists

  • Judith Brine: architect, academic and long-time participant in SA public life
  • Lin Hatfield Dodds: social activist, National Director of UnitingCare Australia and Chair of the Australian Social Inclusion Board
  • Angelique Edmonds: academic, architect, public engagement champion
  • Susan Phillips: architect, advocate, director Phillips/Pilkington Architects

Chaired by Justine Clark

At the end of the session enjoy a chat, a snack and ‘Wines by KT‘ before heading off to How Soon is Now?

When

2.30–5.30 pm, 28 April, 2015

Where

Bradley Forum,
Level 5, Hawke Building,
University of South Australia
55 North Terrace, SA 5000

Bookings

Book online here

Cost

$25 / $10 for students, those not working and other concessions.

Introducing our speakers

Judith Brine

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Judith came to South Australia in 1972 and was appointed as an academic in architecture and has, in some sort, remained an academic ever since; at the same time, participating in government advisory work largely in the fields of heritage and planning to Federal, South Australian and ACT Governments. Other areas of contribution included periods on the Board of the ACT Electricity and Water Commission, the SA Environment and Development Court and the Adelaide City Council.

 

 

Lin Hatfield Dodds
Lin HD photo

Lin is the National Director of UnitingCare Australia, and one of Australia’s leading social justice advocates. A recognised expert on social policy and community services, she has served on a wide range of boards and government advisory bodies, and is a frequent media commentator and conference speaker.

Lin’s background includes working as a counselling psychologist and as a public policy advisor on health and community services within federal and state governments.

 

Susan Phillips

Sue Phillips 2 (1)Susan is a founding partner of Phillips/Pilkington Architects and has led many of the practice’s award-winning buildings, including a wide range of community and cultural projects. She has extensive community engagement experience and has taken on many advisory and advocacy roles, making a huge contribution to the profession and the city throughout her career. Susan is a strong advocate for women in architecture, and is a mentor for many. She was awarded the 2013 Sir James Irwin AIA (SA Chapter) President’s Medal with partner Michael Pilkington.

 

Angelique Edmonds

A Edmonds portrait

Angelique has a passion for design education and creating resilient communities engaged in the decisions which impact upon their everyday lives. She is the founder and Creative Director of the School for Creating Change and a Senior Lecturer in Architecture & Sustainable Design at the University of South Australia.

As a former board member of SA Council for the Care of Children and Engagement Leader of 5000+, an Integrated Design Strategy for inner Adelaide, in 2012 she led a collaborative forum of 400 South Australians considering child- and youth-friendly approaches to city-making in SA.

She has worked with Indigenous communities in Arnhem Land and established design advocacy projects with CALD women in Sydney’s South West and with youth at risk of homelessness in South Australia.

 

This event builds on a very successful session Parlour ran at the MPavilion last yearlisten to the audio here.

Women Transforming the City – Part 2 is presented by Parlour and the Australian Institute of Architects National Committee for Gender Equity, in partnership with AWS. It is supported by ODASA, UniSA and Wines by KT. Thanks to everyone involved!

 

Event Partner

AWS-BLACK

Event supporters

ODASA1       logo

 

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Join Parlour http://archiparlour.org/sign-up-to-parlour/ http://archiparlour.org/sign-up-to-parlour/#comments Wed, 13 Apr 2016 03:45:58 +0000 http://florence.butterpaper.com/?p=2757 Sign up to Parlour to be kept informed on upcoming initiatives and to participate in the discussion.

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Join the Parlour community.

Sign up to the site to be kept informed on upcoming initiatives and events and to participate in the discussion.

For more about participating see the Get involved page.

 

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How Soon is Now? http://archiparlour.org/how-soon-is-the-2016-national-architecture-conference/ http://archiparlour.org/how-soon-is-the-2016-national-architecture-conference/#comments Tue, 12 Apr 2016 02:18:47 +0000 http://archiparlour.org/?p=13105 Have you got your tickets for the National Architecture Conference in Adelaide yet? You better get your skates on. It's less than a month away.

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Have you got your tickets for the National Architecture Conference in Adelaide yet? You better get your skates on. It’s less than a month away, and there are plenty of women among the speakers.

The 2016 conference brings together a range of speakers and themes under the banner How Soon is Now? Topics to be covered include Building Resilience, Advocating Futures, Sustainability and Innovation, and Creating Equity.

The program includes a diverse range of speakers, from the emerging to the established, from city-makers to small-scale interventionists. And seven out of the sixteen confirmed speakers are women! This (almost) 50/50 split is a result of the conference directors’ belief that actions speak louder than words when considering equity, and that this aligns with the theme, How Soon is Now? Among the impressive line-up are the following international speakers:

Nasrine Seraji, founding director of Atelier Seraji Architectes et Associés

Nasrine studied at the Architectural Association in London and moved to Paris where she established her practice in 1989. Some key projects include the Temporary American Centre in Paris, student housing in Paris and an extension to the School of Architecture in Lille. Nasrine will be speaking on Friday 29 April and joining the Advocating Futures panel discussion on Saturday 30 April.

Nasrine Seraji

Nasrine Seraji

French School of Vienna, Atelier Seraji Architectes et Associés, photographer Jens ArnoldArteFactoryLab

French School of Vienna by Atelier Seraji Architectes et Associés, photographer Jens ArnoldArteFactoryLab

Sadie Morgan, a co-founding director of the award-winning British practice dRMM Architects

The practice is well known for its socially useful architecture, but Sadie has also built a reputation as an advocate for the profession, being the youngest female President of the Architectural Association in 2013. She was shortlisted for the AJ Woman Architect of the Year and received the CBI First Woman Award in 2015. Sadie will be speaking on Friday 29 April and joining the Transforming Populations panel discussion on Saturday 30 April.

Sadie Morgan

Sadie Morgan

1. Clapham Manor Primary School (2009), photographer Jonas Lencer

Clapham Manor Primary School by dRMM Architects, photographer Jonas Lencer

 

Other international guest speakers include Astrid Klein (director, Klein Dytham architecture), Julie Eizenberg (director, Koning Eizenberg Architecture), Thomas Fisher (University of Minnesota) and Vicente Guallart (director, Guallart Architects). A number of inspiring Australian architects will also feature on the program: Kerstin Thompson, Sandra Kaji-O’Grady, John Wardle and Nick Tridente.

The countdown to How Soon is Now? is on. Be sure to register and join in the dialogue about the transformative power of architecture in our rapidly changing world.

When:

28–30 April 2016

Where:

Adelaide Convention Centre, North Terrace, Adelaide

For more information, see the list of all confirmed speakers, and register here.

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Vale Zaha Hadid, 1950–2016 http://archiparlour.org/vale-zaha-hadid-1950-2016/ http://archiparlour.org/vale-zaha-hadid-1950-2016/#comments Sat, 02 Apr 2016 03:14:28 +0000 http://archiparlour.org/?p=13125 In the midst of many tributes to Zaha Hadid, Gill Matthewson offers a short reflection on what her career means in the context of gender and architecture, while John Gollings shares a fabulous image from his archive. Zaha Hadid has died suddenly in Miami at the young age of 65. She has been a controversial figure in architecture. For some, she was an inspirational and visionary architect who broke rules and showed us the possibilities of an ambitious and complex architecture of new experiences; an architecture of the future and way outside the norms. For others she was the epitome of the self-absorbed, arrogant architect. I see her as someone who demonstrated just how much determination and social, cultural, economic (and, perhaps, exotic) capital a woman of her generation needed to break through the enormous barriers her gender raised in the world of architecture. As John Seabrook wrote in the New Yorker following her death, “she took no shit from anybody, though plenty was offered.” That the plentiful shit she received was liberally laced with sexism is undeniable1, but her presence has helped reduce that sexism for subsequent generations. It’s still there, but less. Rem Koolhaas once called Hadid ‘a planet in […]

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In the midst of many tributes to Zaha Hadid, Gill Matthewson offers a short reflection on what her career means in the context of gender and architecture, while John Gollings shares a fabulous image from his archive.
Zaha Hadid with Ian McDougall, Melbourne. Photograph by John Gollings, "Was a relaxed family sort of visit, kids all around talking to her. She agreed to some group portraits. Her book of renderings had just come out, which is what Ian is looking at. Note the Marlboro cities which she chain smoked in those days.

Zaha Hadid with Ian McDougall, Melbourne. Photograph by John Gollings, who explains “It was a relaxed family sort of visit, kids all around talking to her. She agreed to some group portraits. Her book of renderings had just come out, which is what Ian is looking at. Note the Marlboro ciggies which she chain smoked in those days.”

Zaha Hadid has died suddenly in Miami at the young age of 65. She has been a controversial figure in architecture. For some, she was an inspirational and visionary architect who broke rules and showed us the possibilities of an ambitious and complex architecture of new experiences; an architecture of the future and way outside the norms. For others she was the epitome of the self-absorbed, arrogant architect.

I see her as someone who demonstrated just how much determination and social, cultural, economic (and, perhaps, exotic) capital a woman of her generation needed to break through the enormous barriers her gender raised in the world of architecture.

As John Seabrook wrote in the New Yorker following her death, “she took no shit from anybody, though plenty was offered.” That the plentiful shit she received was liberally laced with sexism is undeniable1, but her presence has helped reduce that sexism for subsequent generations. It’s still there, but less.

Rem Koolhaas once called Hadid ‘a planet in her own inimitable orbit’. Some might argue that that orbit had become more predictable in recent years, but she showed that there are potentials for other orbits to exist in architecture. We should honour and celebrate that.

 

Footnote

  1. Igea Troiani (2012): Zaha: An Image of “The Woman Architect”, Architectural Theory Review, 17:2–3, 346–364.

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Lovely master bedroom, Mr Dickens http://archiparlour.org/lovely-master-bedroom-mr-dickens/ http://archiparlour.org/lovely-master-bedroom-mr-dickens/#comments Fri, 01 Apr 2016 06:44:18 +0000 http://archiparlour.org/?p=13115 'Master bedroom', are you kidding me? Anthony Martin reminds his colleagues that certain phrases have no role in contemporary architecture.

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‘Master bedroom’, are you kidding me? Anthony Martin reminds his colleagues that certain phrases have no role in contemporary architecture.

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I really love a good musical, watch-them-over-and-over-while-singing-out-loud love them. My kids refuse to watch them with me anymore. My absolute favourite would have to be the 1968 version of Oliver. So many very memorable scenes – Harry Secombe trudging through the snow trying to sell Oliver for seven guineas “that or therebouts”, the kindly Mr Brownlow, master of a wealthy household, who takes Oliver in, or the darkly unforgettable scene of kindly Nancy perishing at the hands of evil Bill Sikes. There’s nothing like a combination of catchy show tunes and Charles Dickens’ London.

Thankfully selling kids or using them for cheap labour and violence of any sort against women is not tolerated or acceptable in today’s society, musical or otherwise. However, the quite Dickensian idea of a ‘master of the house’ would appear to be alive and well in the world of architecture. The master of the house has his own bedroom and ensuite, his domain is clearly delineated and noted on architectural plans by far too many of our colleagues.

The use of ‘master’ in a domestic setting is not only sexist – for reasons so obvious that I am not even going in to them here – but also inherently racist. The term also has a direct lineage to slave owners in pre-civil war America. ‘Uncle Tom’s Cabin’ the musical anyone?

Perhaps the apparent increasing usage of master bedroom, suite and ensuite is related to the burgeoning size of Australian homes. Do the largest houses in the world require the use of such inappropriate room tags to describe their parent retreats, media rooms, butler pantries and master rooms?

Whatever the reason for the unfortunate ongoing adaption and usage there is no place for the use of the word ‘master’ on architectural plans, period. So, unless you are designing a plantation in the first half of the nineteenth century or maybe you are Mr Trump’s personal architect, we have to stop using the word ‘master’ and enlighten others around us.

Anthony Martin is director of MRTN Architects. 

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An open letter to members of the Australian Institute of Architects http://archiparlour.org/an-open-letter-to-members-of-the-australian-institute-of-architects/ http://archiparlour.org/an-open-letter-to-members-of-the-australian-institute-of-architects/#comments Wed, 30 Mar 2016 05:02:52 +0000 http://archiparlour.org/?p=13094 Michael Smith is urging all members of the Australian Institute of Architects to support a campaign for more diverse leadership. We republish his letter to members.

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Michael Smith is urging all members of the Australian Institute of Architects to support a campaign for more diverse leadership. We republish his letter to members. 

An open letter to members of the Australian Institute of Architects

Dear members

Today I am taking the unusual step of writing an open letter to other regular members of the Australian Institute of Architects to ask your support for an Institute issue currently in the balance. As you are hopefully aware National Council, led by our President Jon Clements have set about reforming the leadership structure of the institute. This bold move, based on professional governance advice from Clayton Utz, seeks to create an eight person Board of Directors consisting of five National Councillors and three direct appointments with particular skill sets. The purpose of these changes is to create a more effective governance structure for the Institute.

Changes of this magnitude are not a frequent event and any implemented reforms are unlikely to be substantially changed further for many decades. These reforms therefore present as the best opportunity to set the Institute up as being the progressive and well respected 21st century organisation that we need it to be.

In response to the request for member input, the Institutes’ National Committee for Gender Equity put forward the following proposal for consideration.

Given the current structure of the National Council and the methodology for creating the Board membership we would ask that you mandate a minimum 3 seats represented by men and a minimum 3 seats represented by women. We would also ask that an aspirational target be set at 4 women and 4 men, which could be communicated to National Councillors prior to voting in new members of the Board of Directors.

There are many reasons why mandating gender diversity in theInstitutes’ board of directors is of vital importance. I will briefly outline them below

  • The board of directors should be representative of the broader Institute membership.
  • A diverse board is more likely to consider a wider range of viewpoints and to make better decisions.
  • Studies have shown that businesses with diverse boards achieve better financial results than those that are not diverse. Given the Institutes recent financial performance this is vital to achieve a robust organisation.
  • A diverse board would help the Institute become a progressive twenty-first-century organisation. Mandating diversity at the board level, sends a strong message both within the Institute and to external organisations, government bodies and the general public.

Mandating diversity is quickly becoming standard practice for organisations of all sizes. In 2015 the Victorian Government mandated that for all paid board positions and court appointments a minimum of 50% of appointments should be from women. To quote Premier Andrews:

I’m sick of walking into meetings and seeing a room full of blokes sitting around a table. How does that guarantee the best decisions? How does that influence the culture of an organisation for the better?Daniel Andrews, Premier of Victoria

Now is the time for members to have their say on how our Institute proceeds. Will it be a closed shop, or will we make sure that we have the best performing team, which can represent us, make better decisions for us, and provide a sound financial base for our institute well into the future?

If you support this initiative please send an email to constitution@architecture.com.au before 5 April.

To assist your response, you can also use the attached letter template to voice your support for diverse leadership of the Institute.

It is crucial that all members, students, graduates, architects and affiliates all speak up about how they want to be represented by the Australian Institute of Architects, so please also share this letter amongst your colleagues.

Thank you for your time 

Architecture is for Everyone

Michael Smith
Director / Architect
Atelier Red+Black

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Women in Architecture: Clare Kwok http://archiparlour.org/women-in-architecture-clare-kwok/ http://archiparlour.org/women-in-architecture-clare-kwok/#comments Mon, 21 Mar 2016 07:40:33 +0000 http://archiparlour.org/?p=13078 Meet Clare Kwok, our latest profile in the National Gender Equity Committee's Women in Architecture series.

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‘It’s an exciting time for women in architecture’, says Clare Kwok, an Associate at ClarkeHopkinsClarke (CHC) and our latest profile in the Women in Architecture series.
Clare.Kwok_image 1

Photo by Rachael Dere

 

Clare Kwok is an Associate at Melbourne-based ClarkeHopkinsClarke. She became a registered architect in 2011 and joined the CHC team in 2012. Originally working solely on retail projects, she has recently also joined the multi-residential sector of the practice. Her most prominent projects to date include design work on the Coburg North Shopping Centre that features a ‘future’ Green Star Coles store (being used as an example Australia-wide), the South Morang Central Shopping Centre and commercial offices at York St, South Melbourne.

What do you enjoy most in the practice of architecture?

Growing up I was constantly rearranging my bedroom and playing with Lego blocks; I felt the possibilities of design were endless. Today, through this industry I get to experience this on a much bigger scale.

I enjoy starting with a blank page and eventually being able to experience my design in a three dimension built form. I particularly enjoy the challenge of working with a team of different consultants to find solutions and ensure that a project’s social, commercial and financial conditions are met.

I feel architecture is one of few industries that allows professionals to be heavily involved in multiple disciplines at the same time, such as the retail and multi-residential sectors that I specialise in. It’s perfect for someone like me who grew up wanting to do everything!

What is the biggest challenge you have faced as a woman in architecture and how did you overcome it?

I think communication and understanding other perspectives is a constant challenge, whether that refers to understanding cultural issues, language barriers or being a woman in a male-dominated industry. I have always taken the approach to try and meet these challenges head-on.

I think it is particularly important to ensure you have adequate support both at home and in the office.

Like all aspects of life, there will undoubtedly be situations at work where topics of conversation arise that you may have no interest (or understanding) in. I think the key is to take this in your stride and treat each experience as a potential opportunity to broaden your horizons. You never know, you might actually come to pick up a few things and it does help when your team is going pretty well (go the Hawks!!).

Who do you look up to in the architecture profession?

Les Clarke, one of CHC’s founders, who still works in the practice today. It’s great having him in the office, seeing the way he carries himself, and observing how he just gets on with the work every day.

Les always reminds me to keep things simple and not to rely too heavily on technology. Good architecture always speaks for itself!

 

Sth Morang Shopping Centre 1

Sth Morang Shopping Centre 2

South Morang Shopping Centre

What are you looking forward to in your career?

Quite a lot! 2015 was a big year for me both personally and professionally and 2016 is shaping up to be even bigger.

I am looking forward to moving into a more senior role within the firm and broadening my experience into a new specialisation and sector (multi-residential).

As a new associate at CHC, I look back on all the support I received when I first started my career and think it is critical that we (and I) continue to develop and support the younger members of the firm. I look forward to being able to mentor and develop our junior staff and pass on all the knowledge I have gained over the years.

Similarly, I believe creating work-life balance is critical for a long career. I look forward to balancing my career with family life in the future and think as an industry we have an exciting opportunity to better support a growing number of working mums. I think we are experiencing an exciting time for women in architecture, with a lot more women (and mothers) achieving senior positions. I believe the opportunities are there if you take the initiative and establish what works for yourself and your office. Remember, flexibility is a two-way street.

What do you see as your core strength in the practice of architecture?

I believe my key strength is putting ideas into action and not waiting for someone else to fix the problem. I think having a ‘can-do’ attitude as well as having a curious mind is an attribute that allows me to better experience all that the industry has to offer.

Coles Coburg North

Coles, Coburg North Shopping Centre

 

 

Clare Kwok was interviewed by Michael Smith from Atelier Red+Black. This profile is co-published with the Australian Institute of Architects.

 

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Mind the Gap http://archiparlour.org/mind-the-gap/ http://archiparlour.org/mind-the-gap/#comments Wed, 16 Mar 2016 09:10:46 +0000 http://archiparlour.org/?p=13019 The gender pay gap in architecture does not discriminate, hitting just about every age group. Gill Matthewson digs into the Census stats and uncovers disturbing results.

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The gender pay gap in architecture does not discriminate, hitting just about every age group from young graduates to architects of 30 years standing. Gill Matthewson digs into the Census stats and uncovers disturbing results.
Mind The Gap

Image courtesy of Sian To, London Underground Lover.

The gender pay gap is the difference between what women are paid compared to men. Once upon a time, women were paid less than men on principle because men had to support families and women didn’t. Although family structures and social attitudes have shifted that thinking (and law changes have made it outright illegal), the gender pay gap still seems to persist across most industries. Looking closely at the data from the 2011 Census reveals the size of that gap for architects, and shows how it increases with age.

In a previous post I wrote that working out the statistics for the architecture profession was complicated – very complicated. That was never truer than for the gender pay gap. We suspected it was there – there are many hints, and why would architecture be any different than other area – but tracking down its extent is not easy. All the statistical sets bring with them complexities; in particular, any survey collects data from a limited number and range of people, and so can be skewed one way or another.

The Census provides the most inclusive and comprehensive count of those active in the profession. This means that is is also one of the most useful resources when seeking to understand the nature of the pay gap.1

The Census is more reliable than any other source  for two interrelated reasons. Firstly, the very large number of respondents means that, for the most part, the resulting figures avoid the anomalies and uneven data that can arise from smaller or more limited surveys. Secondly, this large amount of data can be broken down into smaller units – in terms of the pay gap the most important breakdown is by age, as discussed below.2

However, despite this comprehensive coverage, the Census data is not perfect. Calculations at the high pay end of earnings are not especially accurate because the highest pay category available is ‘more than $2,000 a week’, which corresponds to a salary of $104,000. This means that we cannot differentiate between those earning $105,000 and those earning over $250,000 – a sizeable gap! This affects our understanding of the pay of just under a quarter of all architects, who the 2011 Census records as earning over $2,000 per week. In the calculations outlined below I compensate for this by making a rough, but conservative, estimate using data from the annual Association of Consulting Architects National Salary Survey.

Age and the pay gap

It is particularly important to break the numbers down by age, because the age profile of men in architecture is much older than that for women. Figure 1 shows this imbalance for women and men in full-time work from the 2011 Census.

Fig 1

Figure 1: Number of persons in age cohort by gender – full-time workers

This very different age profile distorts any overall average income by gender because it means that more men are more experienced and therefore likely to earn more. Consequently, the average pay gap for full-time architectural workers comes out at an alarming 19%; women earning on average $68,154 per annum and men $84,206. If part-time workers were included in the calculation the gap would widen further, because more women than men work part-time. The best way to overcome these distortions introduced by differing age profiles and work-force participation is to look at earnings for full-time workers by age group. This gives some kind of even footing for comparison (see Figure 2).3

Fig 2 

Figure 2: Average annual income by age and by gender

Figure 2 shows that there is a consistent pattern of a pay gap – men are paid more than women and this difference gets greater as age increases. The only anomaly is for those aged 60–64 years. This deviation is simply because there are not many women in this group – 40 women and 705 men, to be precise (figure 1). This means that each woman represents nearly 3% of all the women in the age cohort, so it doesn’t take many to flip the chart; small sample sizes such as this cause anomalies.

It is also important to note that because a considerable proportion of people in the age groups over 40 are earning in the highest bracket, the gaps shown are conservative and may actually be greater. This is because of the approximation at this end of earnings as outlined above.

Another way to look at the pay gap is to look at the distribution of people within the earning brackets identified in the 2011 Census – this is shown in Figure 3.

Figure 3: Distribution of earnings per week by age group and gender

Proportionally, fewer men earn in the lower bands of less than $1,000 a week (those coloured green) in every age bracket. The reverse is true for the highest earning bracket (those in red) where, proportionally, more men are earning more than $1,500 a week in all age cohorts (except for the anomaly of the 60–64 group).

Of most concern are the younger age groups, particularly 25–29, where we see a gender pay difference of 6% (note that this figure is the same as that identified in the 2012 GradStats report). This is especially disturbing for a number of reasons. In this age group we can assume that the experience levels of full-time architects are similar and many would still be covered by the Architects Award. Fewer in this younger age group are likely to have families, something that can typically impede women’s careers. Lastly, the sample size for this group is also large, with women well represented, which results in particularly reliable data.

The gap is not great for the mid-earners within this cohort – roughly half the women and half the men aged 25–34 earn between $1,000 and $1,500 a week – but we see the difference at the upper and lower limits. A quarter of the men earn more than $1,500 but just 15% of the women. And 35% of the women earn under $1,000 while only 27% of the men do. Keep in mind that these are full-time workers. All indicators suggest that this gap will only expand as this group progesses through their careers.

Where does the pay gap come from and what can we do about it?

Pay gaps are tricky things, and inequity can occur both within individual practices and across the profession – that is, between practices. There are reasons why different firms might have different capacities to pay different salaries. Factors include a practice’s client base and the type of work they do: for example, commercial fees traditionally have more flesh on them than social infrastructure, and high-end residential more than small-scale additions and alterations. Different types of roles are also rewarded differently (for example, the ACA Salary Survey suggests that BIM managers are among the highest paid, and there are suggestions of a gender imbalance in these roles). However, women now make up more than a third of the Census architect population and are spread throughout the profession in firms of all sizes and configurations – especially in those younger cohorts. There is no reason to assume that women cluster in practices that pay lower wages.

This suggests that we need to look at the more complex factors of gender bias that can tint how we interact in architecture and that subsequently impact on women’s careers and earning capacity. As the Parlour Guide to Pay Gap notes, these include:

  • Differing starting salaries (which the data above confirms is certainly happening)
  • Uneven pay rises and opportunities for promotion for employees with similar experience and performance
  • Different pay rates for roles requiring similar levels of expertise, skill and experience
  • Different negotiation skills and expertise
  • Different levels of pay for part-time employees who are performing the same work as their full-time counterparts
  • Uneven access to opportunities for professional development
  • Uneven access to bonuses or performance pay
  • More limited employment or promotion prospects for those with family responsibilities

Many of these factors are cumulative and build up, one of top of the other, over time.

The nature of gender bias and consequent inequity is such that it often sneaks in like a nasty weed and it requires vigilance to keep under control. Use the Parlour Guides to help keep the weeds at bay and ensure that you are not letting covert biases disadvantage women in terms of pay.

 

Gill Matthewson is a researcher, architect and educator, based at Monash University. Her PhD “Dimensions of Gender: women’s careers in the Australian architecture profession” was awarded by the University of Queensland in 2015. 

Image: courtesy of Sian To of London Underground Lover

Footnotes
  1. Census data was requested from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) as part of the State of the Profession Research for the Association of Consulting Architects – South Australia, funded through a grant from the Architectural Practice Board of South Australia, led by John Held and Sue Phillips of ACA – SA. Thanks to ACA ­­– SA for making this data available for this analysis.
  2. There is a limit to how far the data can be broken down. We initially asked for the data divided not just by age but also hours worked and occupation status (owner, employee, etc). ABS informed us that that level of detail leads to strange statistical anomalies and would not be reliable.
  3. First I nominated a single figure in the middle of each income bracket provided by the ABS (so in the $800–999 range, $900 was the figure). That figure was then multiplied by the number of men and the number of women in the bracket. The total for the age group was added and then divided by the total number of men and women in the age group. For those earning more than $2,000, the figure $2,400 was used.

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Join the Victorian Design Review Panel http://archiparlour.org/join-the-victorian-design-review-panel/ http://archiparlour.org/join-the-victorian-design-review-panel/#comments Sat, 12 Mar 2016 06:33:11 +0000 http://archiparlour.org/?p=13024 Are you passionate about great buildings and welcoming public spaces? Join the Victorian Design Review Panel to help deliver a high quality built environment for all.

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The Office of the Victorian Government Architect is seeking nominations from interested built environment professionals to join the Victorian Design Review Panel.

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Are you passionate about delivering high quality places for people, wonderful buildings and well used and loved public spaces?

Are you expert at reviewing complex projects and immediately seeing their potential and identifying issues to resolve?

Are you a strong and confident communicator, able to influence clients and design teams in a constructive and positive way?

The OVGA is seeking suitably qualified individuals who have strong experience in design review to join the Victorian Design Review Panel for a two-year term. Applicants are sought from the fields of architecture, landscape architecture, planning and urban design – or from built environment professionals with specialist expertise, particularly in heritage, Indigenous cultural heritage, transport and infrastructure, economics, development value capture, design competitions and urban planning.

Established in 2012, the Victorian Design Review Panel provides independent and expert design review of significant public and private sector projects to ensure best value and highest quality in the interests of all Victorians.

To learn more about the work of the Victorian Design Review Panel, visit the OVGA offices on Thursday 17 March from 8.30 am to 9.30am for a full briefing and Q&A session. Or refer to the OVGA website to find out more information about the panel and how to apply. Applications close on Wednesday 30 March.

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Editing architecture http://archiparlour.org/editing-architecture/ http://archiparlour.org/editing-architecture/#comments Thu, 10 Mar 2016 22:05:26 +0000 http://archiparlour.org/?p=13005 Nancy Levinson, editor of Places Journal is in Australia in mid March. To celebrate MADA is hosting a discussion panel to explore the shifting paradigms of architectural publication. Five editors will share their thoughts on editing as critical practice, audiences of architecture, the challenges and opportunities of new media, and alternative publication models. Speakers Nancy Levinson, Places Journal (USA) Jacqui Alexander, POST Magazine Sara Savage, Assemble Papers Maitiú Ward, Architecture AU/Uro Media Chaired by Justine Clark, Parlour When 6pm, Thursday, 17 March Where Room 1.04, Building G Monash Architecture and Design Caulfield Campus

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Nancy Levinson, editor of Places Journal is in Australia in mid March. To celebrate MADA is hosting a discussion panel to explore the shifting paradigms of architectural publication.

Five editors will share their thoughts on editing as critical practice, audiences of architecture, the challenges and opportunities of new media, and alternative publication models.

Speakers
  • Nancy Levinson, Places Journal (USA)
  • Jacqui Alexander, POST Magazine
  • Sara Savage, Assemble Papers
  • Maitiú Ward, Architecture AU/Uro Media

Chaired by Justine Clark, Parlour

When

6pm, Thursday, 17 March

Where

Room 1.04, Building G
Monash Architecture and Design
Caulfield Campus

MADA Talks 2016 - A3 Poster - Editing Architecture

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